19 Dec 2005

Singapore paper attacks Australian media

Handbags at ten paces ladies...

Saturday Dec 17 14:50 AEDT
Singapore's main English-language newspaper has taken a wide swing at the Australian media, contrasting its treatment of this month's hanging in Singapore of drug trafficker Nguyen Tuong Van and Sydney's race-related violence.

In its editorial, The Straits Times said in the run-up to the execution of Nguyen the Australian media was filled with commentary suggesting the mark of civilisation was to be kind to gangsters, hooligans and drug pushers.

In contrast, the editorial said: "This week the NSW parliament passed tough new laws to give the state's police exceptional powers to deal with the riots that have broken out in Sydney."

It also highlighted Prime Minister John Howard's comments that such incidents can happen in any country, adding: "Yes, they certainly can, prime minister. Pity many of your compatriots did not see that a couple of weeks ago", around the time of the Nguyen hanging. [Is this paragraph coherent?]

Nguyen, 25, was hanged on December 2 for importing almost 400 grams of heroin into Singapore in late 2002.

Singapore law mandates the death penalty for those convicted of drug trafficking, set at 15 grams for those caught with heroin.

The Nguyen case raised intense interest in Australia, with the Howard government leading a passionate - but unsuccessful - bid for clemency.

During the final weeks of Nguyen's life, The Straits Times gave increasing amounts of space to the drama, and in an editorial at the time it argued the former salesman should not be spared.

The Straits Times has close links to Singapore's ruling People's Action Party and is broadly supportive of government policy, or what local officials call nation-building.

The editorial went on to offer broad praise for Australia's efforts to promote racial harmony, but laced that analysis with caution.

"While racism may be on the rise in the country, Australia's record on this front is better than many other countries, including Islamic ones, now expressing their alarm over the fate of Muslims Down Under," the paper said.

It concluded, "The country's achievement in creating a plural society will be threatened if its leaders do not face squarely, and address frankly, the racism that lingers in Australian society."

28 comments:

Anonymous said...

Singapore government is a sore loser.

Why didn't S'pore govt want people to know about the HIGH DEATH PENALTY TOLL???

Is death penalty for drug trafficking is successful, why is there so many people being hanged every year.

well..see here:

http://web.amnesty.org/library/index/engasa360012004

Anonymous said...

If death penalty for drug trafficking is successful, why is there still so many people being hanged every year???

well..see here:

http://web.amnesty.org/library/index/engasa360012004

"It is never the real traffickers who are caught. The ones who are caught and hanged are often poor, desperate people, who are being made use of. By hanging them, we are helping to perpetuate the plan of the real traffickers who are very smart. They use people they can afford to lose to carry the drugs for them. So if we carry on with the death penalty, they will get away and the root of the problem is never really solved." A Singaporean lawyer, quoted in the New Paper, 17 June 2001.

LuckySingaporean said...

No the Singapore papers did not "attack" Australia. It was mere highlighting the problems of Australian society - drugs, crime, and riots. It is only coincidental that these articles appear just after Nguyen was hanged.

It is totally irrational for Singaporeans to immigrate there given the total breakdown of Australian society. As our MM Lee once said, only those 2nd rate talents immigrate to Australia which is a far worse place than Singapore.

After reading those Straits Times articles on Australia, I feel fortunate to be a citizen of Singapore.

http://happycitizen.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

I am a black South African, who grew up in Apartheid South Africa. Having travelled in Australia, I can attest first-hand that my experience was tainted on more then one occasion by overt racism.

The Singaporean editors might have seized on the opportunity to deal Australia a black eye with less then pure motives. This does not however change the fact that some work remains to be done Down Under.

S.

Anonymous said...

Morons, the more drug traffickers Singapore hangs, the less drug traffickers there are out there to traffick drugs and killing youths.

The increase in drug traffickers being caught only says Singapore is getting more efficient in catching drug traffickers.

Anonymous said...

s'pore doesn't do things by coincidence and no it is not irrational to migrate to australia. the standard of living there is lower (houses and cars r so much cheaper) and they aren't as elitist. luckysingporean's intelligence leaves much to be desired; he is a happy slavedog who believes everything the ST prints and should just bask in his naivety in his own blog instead of coming here where he's not welcome.

Mickell said...

I think about the only things which Australia can offer which Singapore can't is: abundant cheap land, cheap cars, Gold Coast theme parks, Ayers Rock etc. Damn there's a whole lot of things Down Under which can't be found in miserablly pathetic Singabloodypore ;p

Anonymous said...

I wonder whether anyone has forgotten about that shooting in the aus uni incident, and the murdering of asian students shootout incidents. Raising your kids in aus should be a damn peace of mind, hope your kids return home from school in one piece(if he survives the school shootouts) or returns in one mind(if he survives the peer drug abuse). Australia is such a "high" country, no wonder so many aussies worship drug traffickers like a saint!

Anonymous said...

michael chua, you forgot your "cheap" morals. And not forgetting how eay it is for a hotdog seller to up the ranks to become a red headed racist biatch politician(who is jailed) who wants asians to scram out of her non-elitist country. You sure can't find that in Singapore.

Anonymous said...

Yup... Australia is all too perfect to be criticised... Go ahead... bully Singapore because its small... what the hell, might as well believe everything the media exaggerates about Singapore.... read with an opinion, not for an opinion... Whoever said that "luckysingporean's intelligence leaves much to be desired; he is a happy slavedog who believes everything the ST prints" probably believes what everyone else says about Singapore as well.. if that's the case, what contradiction. The world is not black and white ppl.

Anonymous said...

Australia is full of a bunch of racist pigs... outright racist... bet you if Nguyen was a white Australian, John Howard and the rest of the Aussie crew down under would have put up a much bigger fight.

mister k said...

I think it's absolutely ironic considering the fact that the nation was trying to get an "Australian" of Vietnamese decent off the gallows and now, these are the same group of people being part of the racist riots.
In the world of journalism, all news is shaped toward the reader's empathy. Singapore was placed in a bad light over the Nguyen issue. I guess as the nation's leading paper, Straits Times had to flex some muscles.

Anonymous said...

Some important points to note:

- More than 400 prisoners have been hanged in Singapore since 1991, giving the small city-state possibly the highest execution rate in the world relative to its population of just over four million people

-"My son is my world, my life and the very essence of my existence... If the death sentence is carried out, it would also be my death sentence because the sorrow of the loss of my only son would surely kill me." Extract from a clemency appeal sent to the President.(7)

-great anguish for the families of those who are executed. Studies have shown that the death penalty is disproportionately imposed on the poorest, least educated and most vulnerable members of society.

- Crime is often linked to other social problems such as poverty, drug abuse, unemployment and the disintegration of the family, problems which are not solved by executions.
. The death penalty is a violation of one of the most fundamental of human rights: the right to life. It is the premeditated and cold-blooded killing of a human being by the state in the name of justice. It is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment.

-Scientific studies have consistently failed to find convincing evidence that the death penalty deters crime more effectively than other punishments.

-"it is not prudent to accept the hypothesis that capital punishment deters murder to a marginally greater extent than does the threat and application of the supposedly lesser punishment of life imprisonment".(9)

-"I do not now believe that any one of the hundreds of executions I carried out has in any way acted as a deterrent against future murder. Capital punishment, in my view, achieved nothing except revenge". Former British executioner Albert Pierrepoint.(10)

-Over half the countries in the world have now abolished it in law or practice. In the past decade more than three countries a year on average have abolished the death penalty for all crimes. They include: Angola, Côte d'Ivoire, Mauritius, Mozambique, South Africa, Canada, Paraguay, Hong Kong, Nepal, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Georgia, Poland, Serbia and Montenegro, Turkmenistan and Ukraine. At present there are 112 countries which are abolitionist in law or practice.

-The Singapore authorities have been criticized by both the United Nations (UN) and the European Union (EU) for their use of the death penalty. The EU has expressed particular concern about Singapore's use of the mandatory death penalty and high executions rates.(11) Member states of the EU resolved in their 1998 policy paper on the death penalty to "work towards universal abolition of the death penalty."

-"In countries which have not abolished the death penalty, capital punishment may be imposed only for the most serious crimes, it being understood that their scope should not go beyond intentional crimes with lethal or other extremely grave consequences."

Safeguard 4 states that: "Capital punishment may be imposed only when the guilt of the person charged is based upon clear and convincing evidence leaving no room for an alternative explanation of the facts."

-Out of 174 executions recorded by Amnesty International from press reports between 1993 and 2003, the number of foreign nationals totals 93, which is more than half. Many of them are believed to have been migrant workers. They have included nationals or citizens of the following: Malaysia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nigeria, Ghana, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and Portugal. According to one source who had been informed by the Ministry of Home Affairs, 44 foreign nationals were executed between 1996 and 2000, out of a total of 157 executions which took place during that period.

-Executions are carried out by hanging and take place at Changi Prison on Friday mornings at dawn. Relatives are allowed to collect the prisoner's body several hours later, once the death certificate has been issued.

-. Relatives have informed Amnesty International that prisoners under sentence of death are kept in strict isolation in individual cells measuring approximately three square metres. The cells are thought to have walls on three sides, with bars on the remaining side. Cells are sparse, furnished only with a toilet and a mat for sleeping, but no bedding. Inmates are allowed the use of a bucket for washing. It is believed that they are not permitted to go outside for fresh air or exercise. They may receive one 20-minute visit per week in a special area where they are separated from visitors by a thick pane of glass and have to communicate via a telephone. About four days before the execution date, as a special concession, prisoners are permitted to watch television or listen to the radio and are given meals of their choice, within the prison's budget. They are also allowed extra visits from relatives but no physical contact is permitted at any time before the execution.

-The authorities maintain strict controls on visitors and may refuse permission to visit to anyone who does not possess the correct papers proving their relationship with the prisoner. Amnesty International was told by one relative that the authorities had even refused her permission to bring in crayon drawings made by her young daughter. Families of convicts are normally informed of the impending execution date less than one week beforehand, causing them great anxiety and uncertainty.

-"You are advised to make the necessary funeral arrangements. If you are unable to do so, cremation will be carried out by the state." Extract from a letter signed by the Superintendent of Changi Prison notifying the family of Malaysian national Vignes s/o Mourthi of his impending execution.(22)

- The majority of executions do not receive any public attention because of the lack of media reporting or public debate in the country. The cases below illustrate how, in practice, the death penalty often falls disproportionately and arbitrarily on the most marginalized or vulnerable members of society. They include young people who are just entering adulthood, drug addicts, the poorly educated, the impoverished or unemployed, and migrant workers.

-Amnesty International has asked the Singapore authorities for information about the procedures for carrying out executions but no reply has been forthcoming. In October 2002 the Minister for Home Affairs launched a preventive drug education website, commissioned by the National Council against Drug Abuse, which tells the harrowing story of a young drug addict who is hanged for trafficking in heroin. The following is an extract from the website: (42) "There are three good reasons for hooding the prisoner. Firstly, it is very important that the condemned person does not move at the last moment, just as the lever is being pulled - which could easily alter the position of the noose and thus cause them a slow death. The second reason is to minimise rope burns and marking of the skin. The third is so they don't have to look at you."

-In the countries which impose the death penalty for drug offences Amnesty International is aware of no evidence of a decline in drug trafficking which could be clearly attributed to the threat or use of the death penalty. While certain countries have introduced the death penalty for drug offences, its use has been rejected elsewhere. Nigeria abolished the death penalty for drug offences in 1986 after several executions provoked widespread protests. Turkey abolished the death penalty for drug trafficking in 1990 as part of a general reduction in the crimes punishable by death. In Mauritius, where the death penalty for drug trafficking had been introduced in 1986, the section of the law providing for the death penalty was declared unconstitutional in 1992.

-Claiming that the death penalty has been effective in controlling the trade in illicit drugs, the Singapore authorities reported an overall decline in the number of drug abusers arrested between 1994 and 2001.(37) However, despite the use of the death penalty and high execution rates, drug addiction continues to be a problem, particularly among the poorly educated, impoverished, unemployed and young people from broken homes. According to the website of the Singapore Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB), a total of 3,393 drug abusers were arrested in 2002. The number of new drug abusers increased by 16% compared to the figures for 2001. The CNB announced that it had seized 63 kilograms of heroin and 34 kilograms of cannabis during 2002, and also reported a significant increase in the use of methamphetamine. This is despite the fact that the scope of the death penalty was increased in 1998 to introduce a mandatory death sentence for importing, exporting, or trafficking in more than 250 grams of the drug.

-"It is never the real traffickers who are caught. The ones who are caught and hanged are often poor, desperate people, who are being made use of. By hanging them, we are helping to perpetuate the plan of the real traffickers who are very smart. They use people they can afford to lose to carry the drugs for them. So if we carry on with the death penalty, they will get away and the root of the problem is never really solved." A Singaporean lawyer, quoted in the New Paper, 17 June 2001.

Anonymous said...

6.2 Case studies

The following six stories represent a tiny fraction of the hundreds of prisoners who have been executed in Singapore. The majority of executions do not receive any public attention because of the lack of media reporting or public debate in the country. The cases below illustrate how, in practice, the death penalty often falls disproportionately and arbitrarily on the most marginalized or vulnerable members of society. They include young people who are just entering adulthood, drug addicts, the poorly educated, the impoverished or unemployed, and migrant workers.

Executed for selling cannabis: Rozman Jusoh from Malaysia

Rozman Jusoh, a 24-year-old labourer from Malaysia, was arrested allegedly after trying to sell 1.04 kg of cannabis to an undercover officer of the Central Narcotics Bureau. In March 1995 he was acquitted of the capital offence of drug trafficking after the trial judge found him to have "sub-normal intelligence, with an IQ of 74." Instead he was found guilty of the lesser offence of drug possession and sentenced to a prison term. After the prosecution filed an appeal, the appeal judge sentenced him to death, stating, "He was educationally sub-normal but that does not absolve him from his criminal deeds."(23) In an interview with Singapore's New Paper his mother said, "When someone's talking to him, he would merely smile or look at you blankly. I don't know how he ever made it through to Secondary 3 in school." She said that the family had planned to enrol him in religious classes and steer him back to the "right path" once he was released from prison. Rozman Jusoh was hanged in April 1996.

Shop assistant executed for drug trafficking: Poon Yuen-chung from Hong Kong

Poon Yuen-chung, a shop assistant from Hong Kong, was only 18 years old when she and her 17-year-old friend, Lam Hoi-ka were arrested at Changi Airport, Singapore, after arriving from Bangkok. The two girls had gone on holiday to Bangkok after telling their parents they were going on a local camping trip. Airport officials found heroin hidden in a secret compartment in their luggage. Both girls denied any prior knowledge of the drugs and said they had been befriended by a Chinese couple in Bangkok who had taken them out to dinner and on sightseeing tours, and later bought suitcases for them. "My sister is a simple and naïve girl who can do foolish things sometimes", Poon Yuen-chung's sister later told the Sunday Morning Post, a Hong Kong newspaper. Despite appeals for clemency, Poon Yuen-chung was executed in April 1995. Her friend Lam Hoi-ka, however, was sentenced to life imprisonment as she was under 18 at the time of the offence.

Drug addict executed: Zulfikar Bin Mustaffah

Zulfikar Bin Mustaffah, aged 32, an unemployed Singaporean, was sentenced to death in November 2000 after being arrested in possession of a package containing approximately 70 grams of heroin. He had allegedly agreed to deliver the package to a man he did not know, but claimed that he was unaware of the contents. Addicted to drugs since the age of 14, Zulfikar Bin Mustaffah dropped out of school at 15 and had spent most of his life in drug rehabilitation centres or in detention. Because drug addicts are treated as criminals in Singapore, Zulfikar had a criminal record, making it very difficult for him to find work. During a sitting of parliament in July 2001, the then parliamentarian J.B. Jeyaretnam, called for a parliamentary debate on the case, saying, "It is a known fact that someone who is given to drug taking over a period of time will have his mental faculties affected, his power to think carefully and to rationalise. He becomes weak-minded and particularly [...] vulnerable to people who try to use him or exploit him."(24) Zulfikar Bin Mustaffah was hanged in September 2001.

Executed after denying involvement in a cannabis case: Thiru Selvam

Thiru Selvam, a 28-year-old Singaporean father of two young children, was arrested after a friend of his was found in possession of approximately 800 grams of cannabis. The friend reportedly told the police that the drugs belonged to Thiru Selvam. At his trial the judge is said to have told him that if he confessed he would be sentenced to 25 years in prison and 24 strokes of the cane. However Thiru Selvam reportedly refused to confess and claimed he was innocent. He was sentenced to death in September 2000, while his friend was given a 25-year prison term.

Thiru Selvam's mother died when he was a baby. His father remarried but began drinking heavily and died when Thiru Selvam was only 16. He began using drugs when he was 14 years old and was admitted to a drug rehabilitation centre the following year. Thiru Selvam was hanged in September 2001.

Executed after an unfair trial: Vignes s/o Mourthi(25) from Malaysia

Vignes s/o Mourthi, a 23-year-old Malaysian national, grew up in a poor family and received only basic education. He was arrested while carrying a plastic bag containing approximately 27 grams of heroin. At his trial he stated that he had been asked by an old family friend, Moorthy A/L Angappan, to carry the bag from Malaysia to Singapore, where he travelled every day for work. He insisted he was unaware of the bag's contents.

Amnesty International is concerned about a number of alleged irregularities during the trial proceedings. The judge refused to adjourn the trial hearing to grant Vignes s/o Mourthi's request to appoint a new lawyer, following his complaint that he was inadequately represented. His conviction appears to have been based largely on a written record, provided by the prosecution, of an incriminating conversation which allegedly took place between him and an officer of the Central Narcotics Bureau. Vignes s/o Mourth denied the conversation took place. The court however deemed the evidence to be admissible despite the fact that no date had been recorded on it and neither Vignes s/o Mourthi nor his lawyer were aware of its existence before it was produced in court.

Following rejection by the President of Vignes s/o Mourthi's appeal for clemency, his new lawyer, convinced of his innocence, lodged a motion for a re-trial on the grounds that there had been a miscarriage of justice and that he had not received a fair trial. Two similar motions lodged by him were rejected. On 25 September 2003, Chief Justice Yong Pung How dismissed his final appeal for a re-trial on the basis that the case could not be reopened as it had already been dealt with by the courts. He reportedly told the lawyer, "You can say he is an innocent man, but as far as the law is concerned, he has been found guilty and convicted. You better say goodbye to him, that's all you can do."(26) Vignes s/o Mourthi and Moorthy A/L Angappan were hanged the following morning at dawn. In a distressing scene following the execution, distraught family members reportedly climbed onto the hearse carrying Vignes' body and pummelled his chest, trying to revive him.(27)

Executed for killing a man during an argument: Arunprakash Vaithilingam from India

Arunprakash Vaithilingam, a 24-year-old migrant worker from Tamil Nadu, India, went to work in Singapore as a ship's electrician in 2000, sharing a cramped flat with several other migrant workers. He was sentenced to death for killing one of his room-mates, who was stabbed to death with a kitchen knife during a drunken argument. At his trial Arunprakash Vaithilingam stated that he had not intended to kill his room-mate and that initially he did not even realize he had stabbed him. He and several friends who witnessed the argument immediately rushed the wounded man to hospital but he was pronounced dead shortly afterwards. Despite eyewitness evidence, the High Court found him guilty of murder, which carries a mandatory death sentence. Appeals for clemency lodged on his behalf by the Government of India were rejected and he was hanged in October 2003.

Anonymous said...

Maron?
haha...you look things just on the surface.

can death penalty curb drug trafficking?

-"It is never the real traffickers who are caught. The ones who are caught and hanged are often poor, desperate people, who are being made use of. By hanging them, we are helping to perpetuate the plan of the real traffickers who are very smart. They use people they can afford to lose to carry the drugs for them. So if we carry on with the death penalty, they will get away and the root of the problem is never really solved." A Singaporean lawyer, quoted in the New Paper, 17 June 2001.


Tell your PAP uncles not to do business with the drug lord again. I know...it is $$$ that makes the world go round....

by the way, i am s'porean

Anonymous said...

As a Singaporean, I can attest to the fact that Singapore’s draconian criminal laws are used more as a means of social control than to achieve some sort of crime-eradication objective.

My dad, who onced worked for the Singaporean government, recounts incidents where the government, for instance, passed legislation overnight so as to convict individuals who are acquitted, individuals whom they deem as ‘threats to national security’ or are considered ‘undesirables’.

The death penalty is used much the same way. Independent studies have shown that the poor and uneducated are disproportionately represented among those executed. These are the same people who turn to crime as a ‘quick fix’ way out of destitution and poverty.

The Singaporean government also has an elitist mentality in relation to the personal successes of its citizens, where the poor, less educated and less fortunate are further marginalised to maintain the ‘pure pool’ of intellectually and financially capable individuals. This programme of breeding successful and wealthy individuals begins at an early age, where kids as young as 9 are placed in a stratified system in primary school; which form class you belong to depends on your grades and is marked with an alphabet. (For instance, in Primary 5, if you’re a top student, you’re placed in Class 5A, with the ‘academically worst’ students being placed in Class 5H. Those with the misfortune of being placed in the ‘H’ class suffer pertutual taunts from the ’smarter’ people.)

So-called ‘mediocrity’ is subject to shaming - public or otherwise - in Singapore, whether it’s the criminals or the less successful/qualified. The death penalty is but another means of social control and social engineering by a government whose ideology is unashamedly Nietzschean.

Anonymous said...

The world is so full of stupid naive people.

Read this: Singapore is not using the death sentence as in an active form of crusade to stamp out drug traffickers, it is simply minding its own buisness unless some moron idiot trafficks drugs and "asks" to be executed.

Read this morons: No one has ever state that executions will reduce the drug trafficking rate but it will certaintly prevent some from taking place.

Yes keep on saying that drug traffickers are victims of society, so why don't these stupid accusers get off their chair and go help alleviate some of society's poverty instead of crapping all day? Man this is why losers like these are not like those busy running the country, these morons don't even have the common intelligence to understand things.

Want to challenge Singapore's laws to protect people from drugs? Then face the consequences and DIE!

Drug traffickers are heartless cold-blooded monsters who traffick drugs which in turn lands up in the brains of children and young adults.

Drug traffickers cause people to fall into the deadly addiction of taking drugs, destroying their minds and bodies, it actually destroys a person's life and will to live like a normal human being.

And now people say executing drug traffickers is unjust and cold-blooded?

These accuser's eyes are grown on their behinds, so naive and yet to grow up and see the real world. These people are obviously not clever enough to run a country or even their own household. I am begining to think if they have sub-normal intelligence. Go on and continue being a religious good-for-nothing simple minded no brainer who worships killers as saints.

Anonymous said...

The world is so full of stupid naive people.

Read this moron: "Singapore is not using the death sentence as in an active form of crusade to stamp out drug traffickers, it is simply minding its own buisness unless some moron idiot trafficks drugs and "asks" to be executed."

Read this: "No one has ever state (sic) that executions will reduce the drug trafficking rate but it will certaintly prevent some from taking place."

Yes keep on saying that drug traffickers are less-than-human scum of society. So why don't these stupid accusers get off their chair and go help kill some of society's scum instead of crapping all day? Man this is why losers like these are not like those busy trying to improve the country. These morons don't even have the common intelligence to understand things.

"Want to challenge Singapore's laws? Then face the consequences and DIE!"

"Casino operators are heartless cold-blooded monsters who market gambling which in turn lands up in the brains of children and young adults. "

"Casino operators cause people to fall into the deadly addiction of gambling, destroying their minds and bodies, it actually destroys a person's life and will to live like a normal human being."

"And now people say executing casino operators is unjust and cold-blooded? "

These accuser's eyes are grown on their behinds, so naive and yet to grow up and see the real world. These people are obviously not clever enough to run a country or even their own household. I am begining to think if they have sub-normal intelligence. Go on and continue being a patriotic good-for-nothing simple minded no brainer who worships killers as saints.

Anonymous said...

Please ammend "patriotic" to "blindly patriotic".

Anonymous said...

In my book, being "patriotic" and being "blindly patriotic" is the same. Both groups are morons.

Anonymous said...

And in case anyone reads this, help me, I need a job as an editor, which newspaper is jialat enough for me to edit?

Anonymous said...

let's just ban all bloody brainless patriots from this blog :)

Anonymous said...

I would like to think that protestors aka the writers of this blog are often the more patriotic ones since they care about Singapore so much as to bloody complain about Singapore all day, but their childishness and lack of action just makes people ignore them like a bunch of losers.

Ong said...

I'm curious as to the grounds that you call the writers of this blog childish and non-action. To me, collecting opposing news reports so that discerning people can form better opinions is neither childish nor an inaction. It is a form of education - exposure to information. If you think that it is just mere complaints, then I think you are being unfair. If you believe the reports to be inaccurate, then calling them losers is just silly. If you voice your objections reasonably, then people will believe you. As it stands, the one that really looks the loser is you.

Anonymous said...

yadda yadda ong is another complainer who doesn't know how to read, joining the losers of the blog which has a *swear* word in its name, let me add the words vulgar(uncivilised), immature(use vulgarities), name-calling(insult name of a country) and coward(the founder run far far away).

ong said...

*LOL*

How ironic! You appear to be the same anonymous person who uses vulgarities, is uncivilised, immature, resorts to name calling ("pig") and a coward (always anonymous).

What a loser. I suggest you stick your head elsewhere because it's hard to respect someone who doesn't respect others.

lol. 'nuff said. Out.

Anonymous said...

The founder is a kaypoh who likes to meddle with other country's affairs and escapes out of cowardice when he can't take the pressure. Now the blog is replaced by his group of mindless lackeys who think they are so influential but actually just noisy bigmouths who no one wants to listen to. Some people are so naive and don't even know when they are being made use of, made use by foreigners some more tsk tsk...

lee hsien tau said...

Actually everybody, whether blind obedient dog or enlightened kaypoh or kowpeh, should be glad that Ngyuen Van Tuong's sentence was not commuted. McDermott may not get the chance, and even though I cannot afford Gardenia bread, I cannot be sure I can avoid it, or else Ngyuen's sweat may be in the bread you eat for the rest of your hoe jia hoe koon fucking pathetic life.

And in case anyone reads this, help me, I need a job as an editor too, which newspaper is jialat enough for me to edit? I can spot 'Flying Falcon' should be 'Fighting Falcon' a mile off.

And if there is no job for me as editor because I cannot fuck care about self-censorship, I can also be auditor or accountant. I can spot backdated expenses just by looking at the accounts. No need to read e-mails one leh. And if you let me loose in IRAS, I can find out what Durai's salary is in less than 2 shakes of a duck's tail. But boh lun ei chiane leh. Even if you ask me to be lame-duck president, I don't need Nathan's peanut kind of salary. I can also no fuck, no drink and no smoke. $5k a month enough already. Ai lai mai suah. I can also promise not to become overweight unlike him. What's so difficult about cutting ribbon?